Cadillac Gage V-100 Commando Armored Car - Vietnam - Build

Postby lmcq11 » Sat Jan 13, 2018 2:40 pm

Hi,

As I wait for parts for my current build, I might as well use these terrible winter weekends to start planning my next one. I've been pretty much a "track" guy during all my previous 1/35 modelling life with a few wheeled AFV here and there when there was nothing new available. I remember the 80s when there was maybe one new model per year coming out... terrible decade, that's before the Chinese got into the hobby. Like the LVTP guys used to say, I am pretty much aligned with their "You ain't tracks, you ain't s**t" motto... RC cars never interested me. Since my 1/16 phase started, I've built around 50+ tanks in that scale, but now I would like to try something else.

The Cadillac Gage family of armored cars have been around since the early 1960s and sold around the world. Even the newest TAPV armored cars getting into service in the Canadian armed forces is basically a modernized version of it. So, this is an historical vehicle that I would like to add to my collection. I have decided to build a V-100 in service with the Military Police during the Vietnam war, and will keep company with my M-113.

M-706.JPG
Cadillac Gage V-100 armored car
M-706.JPG (30.17 KiB) Viewed 4957 times


The base for the build will be the Ludwigs "basic" kit advertised as an M-1117. However, the model provided is not an M-1117 Guardian (picture below) which is different. Just by looking at the position of the kit side doors closer to the back wheel vs the front wheel is a clear indicator that the kit is a V-100 or V-150 version. There are also other core differences.

M-1117.JPG
M-1117 Guardian
M-1117.JPG (82.99 KiB) Viewed 4957 times


Here are the Ludwigs kit parts. Cost is 95Eu for hull and turret component, which is quite reasonable.

Hull parts;

rsz_img_5995.jpg
Ludwigs V-150 armored car


rsz_img_5996.jpg
Ludwigs V-150 armored car


rsz_img_5997.jpg
Ludwigs V-150 armored car


rsz_img_5998.jpg
Ludwigs V-150 armored car


And this is the tree for the turret. The kit has only the core turret. No gun mount and no gun parts are provided so the builder needs to ponder his options. Ludwigs is advertising a 20mm cannot to go with the turret. However, I have done quite a bit of research and the real V-150 20mm turret does not have the same shape of the kit turret.

rsz_img_5999.jpg
Ludwigs V-150 armored car Turret


A V-150 20mm turret should look like this (1/35 Hobby Boss kit below) and cross referenced with other sources. The frontal arrangement, gun mount housing and the overall look and feel are different.

rsz_img_6001.jpg
Hobby Boss V-150 with 20mm gun turret


I think the ludwigs turret is much closer to the Belgian Cockerill 90mm turret (1/35 Hobby Boss kit below) and this is probably the best options for builds that will use the Ludwigs turret. There are a few corrections to be made however. I did not see picture evidence of the side by side hatches aligned like the kit part, the commander's hatch should be a bit more forward. In any cases, I have decided not to use the kit turret. I will build a new smaller turret that fit the V-100 Commando. I will keep this turret for a future project. The top part of the upper hull with the turret ring will be replaced as well.

v-150 cockeril.JPG
Hobby Boss V-150 with 90mm Cockerill turret
v-150 cockeril.JPG (48.41 KiB) Viewed 4957 times


And of course, a WPL M--35 stripped down chassis will be used and modified for the motorization of the model. So, risk is low that this build will go over budget.

rsz_img_6004.jpg
WPL truck chassis


Continuing on following post.

Louis
User avatar
lmcq11
Warrant Officer 1st Class
 
Posts: 1779
Joined: Mon Dec 19, 2016 8:42 pm
Location: Quebec, Canada

Postby lmcq11 » Sat Jan 13, 2018 3:30 pm

Hi,

I have the benefit of having a rare unbuilt Warriors 1/16 scale V-100 resin kit in my collection. That model is basically a solid resin brick that cannot be used for RC. But the plan is to use it as a reference to create this build. I have no intentions on using any the resin kit parts, this would destroy this collector item that i am planning to resale one day.

rsz_img_6005.jpg
Warriors 1/16 V-100


Although it would be tempting to use the wonderful Warriors resin turret on the Ludwigs hull, it has flat armor plates that can be easily reproduced in plasticard. Having it as a reference will greatly help.

rsz_1img_6012.jpg
Warriors 1/16 V-100


Showing the Warriors hull next to the Ludwigs hull clearly show that these have the same dimensions.

rsz_img_6007.jpg
Warriors 1/16 V-100


The key for this build will be to adapt the WPL chassis to the Ludwigs hull. Of course, the spacing between the front and back wheel will need to be reduced and the motor will need to be repositioned. The WPL leaf spring suspension is a bit short and cheap so I will see how it can either be reused or replaced. That is the fun part of such build. And the cost of the WPL chassis is cheap so investment/risk ratio is low no matter what happens.

rsz_img_5994.jpg
V-100 commando


Here I am comparing the WPL chassis to the Warrior hull to mimic the potential integration to the Ludwigs hull to help plan the options. The axels have the right length.

rsz_img_6016.jpg
V-100 commando


Things look right...

rsz_img_6015.jpg
V-100 commando


The Warriors wheels kit parts is oversized. Not sure how the wheels would turn and change directions.

rsz_img_6019.jpg
Warriors V-100 kit


Comparing the Warriors and WPL wheels showing a lot of difference. The V-150 wheels on my 1/35 Hobby boss kit show that their wheels are about 5mm smaller in diameter than the Warriors wheels. So, something in between these two wheels below is likely more accurate.

rsz_img_6009.jpg
V-100 commando


The WPL wheel seems to fit the allocated space on the Warriors chassis more appropriately, but just a bit undersized. The WPL tires are really flat tires... I will therefore need to beef them up so that they look and feel inflated, and they should gain a few mm in diameter in the process. I will have to design a way to do that. I think the WPL wheel cap is close enough to the real one and I will not need rework them to be accurate.

rsz_img_6017.jpg
V-100 commando


The Squadron Signal V-100 walk around book is essential for such build. There is limited info on the web for this vehicle.

rsz_img_6020.jpg
Squadron Signal V-100 Armored Carr


I really liked building the Ludwigs M-113 kit and I hope to have as much fun here. The M-113 and the V-150 are basic simple kits that I feel comfortable building and adapting parts as the build progresses. The V-100 I will build is small, with flat armored plates and cheap motorization option that can be adapted, risk is low. At least I will not have to spend half my time sanding/cutting resin to remove mistakes that a vendor did in trying to detail his model.

That's the plan, the fun starts here.

Regards, Louis
User avatar
lmcq11
Warrant Officer 1st Class
 
Posts: 1779
Joined: Mon Dec 19, 2016 8:42 pm
Location: Quebec, Canada

Postby c.rainford73 » Sat Jan 13, 2018 8:17 pm

Louis another rare and exciting buildThis should be fun :wave:
User avatar
c.rainford73
Major
 
Posts: 5900
Joined: Thu Aug 25, 2016 7:34 pm
Location: Connecticut USA

Postby lmcq11 » Wed Jan 17, 2018 12:47 am

Hi,

Being new to RC wheeled vehicles, associated engines, gears, etc (other than plugging in the battery on a RTR), it takes a bit more time to define where to start the conversion of a truck to a V-100. I decided to move on with what seemed logical to me. Potential mistakes are looming at every corner but everything can be reworked if need be.

In addition to the M-35, I did purchase a DIY (Do It Yourself) version of the associated Gaz truck. There are parts in there that I need, and the rest will be used as backup, spare or replacement if I mess up something. So, first step is to disassemble the rear axel because it will need to be repositioned. At the same time, I need to learn about the structure of the parts, and how they work.

rsz_img_6093.jpg
Ludwigs RC V-100 commando armored car 1/16


This unit, not sure how it is called, that is used for steer the truck need to be replaced by a servo. It makes at terrible racket and provide very limited control.

rsz_img_6101.jpg
Ludwigs RC V-100 commando armored car 1/16


The DIY product provides a servo to replace the stock unit above. Instruction are limited but it is ok, it is a DIY...

rsz_img_6094.jpg
Ludwigs RC V-100 commando armored car 1/16


The servo is of a specific size that I have not seen before (28 x 34 x 13). I tried to find a better one somewhere with metal gears but could not find any. Maybe with more patience... It flips tightly into the deck but a bracket to hold it in place must be made.

rsz_img_6096.jpg
Ludwigs RC V-100 commando armored car 1/16


rsz_img_6104.jpg
Ludwigs RC V-100 commando armored car 1/16


Just need to connect it to the steering, tighten up everything. It is so much smoother than before.

rsz_img_6105.jpg
Ludwigs RC V-100 commando armored car 1/16


The DIY kit includes a small box to put on top of the servo to place the RC receiver. I will see if I keep it as its fate depends on the integration with the V-100 hull.

rsz_img_6107.jpg
Ludwigs RC V-100 commando armored car 1/16


According to my calculations, there should be 170mm between the two axels. So, the rear axel was repositioned accordingly. I hope my calculations were right. I put the lower part of the V-100 on top of the two wheels just to show how the distance looks now. Worst case is that I move it up or down the rail later on to adjust as needed...

rsz_img_6110.jpg
Ludwigs RC V-100 commando armored car 1/16


I have seen limited flexibility in playing with the engine and drive shaft parts. I have not found an easy way to disassemble the drive shaft into single parts. I managed to disconnect the shaft at the joint by gently spreading the lips of the rear U joint that holds the spider in place, nothing broke. So, to reduce the length of the drive shaft end to end, I decided to go the easy way and completely remove the extension to the rear axle and directly connect the engine shaft to the axel shaft. It provides the proper reduction. The rear axle does not jump or move that much so it should be ok. If it does not work, you'll know.

rsz_img_6112.jpg
Ludwigs RC V-100 commando armored car 1/16


Regards, Louis
User avatar
lmcq11
Warrant Officer 1st Class
 
Posts: 1779
Joined: Mon Dec 19, 2016 8:42 pm
Location: Quebec, Canada

Postby Ad Lav » Wed Jan 17, 2018 7:37 am

Very nice! You don't hang about!
User avatar
Ad Lav
Lieutenant
 
Posts: 3536
Joined: Tue Sep 01, 2009 4:44 pm
Location: Kent

Postby silversurfer1947 » Wed Jan 17, 2018 10:54 am

An excellent walk through. I am sure it will be a great help to anyone trying something like this for the first time.
User avatar
silversurfer1947
Lieutenant
 
Posts: 3339
Joined: Tue Oct 27, 2015 10:54 pm
Location: Bristol, UK

Postby lmcq11 » Thu Jan 18, 2018 12:33 pm

Ad Lav wrote:Very nice! You don't hang about!


Hi, yes, as I wait for Shapeways parts to arrive, it is difficult to stand still during these winter months. When I am building something, I am entering a different world, it keeps my mind off the office work and other daily issues. I need it...

silversurfer1947 wrote:An excellent walk through. I am sure it will be a great help to anyone trying something like this for the first time.


I found that when I am publishing a build, I myself am more structured, methodological and focussed. Knowing that my work will be judged, It makes me want to do a better job, go a bit further than before and avoid cutting corners. With pictures, I see many things on a wide screen I did not see with naked eye so it allows me to go back, correct or improve the model. I also noticed that some of my builds are getting as many viewers months after their completion than during construction. I guess it must be helping some folks.

Regards,
Louis
User avatar
lmcq11
Warrant Officer 1st Class
 
Posts: 1779
Joined: Mon Dec 19, 2016 8:42 pm
Location: Quebec, Canada

Postby HERMAN BIX » Thu Jan 18, 2018 12:36 pm

Helping ??................sure is mate, your methodical and very well documented approach is immensely helpful.
User avatar
HERMAN BIX
Lieutenant-Colonel
 
Posts: 7662
Joined: Sun Jan 12, 2014 1:15 am
Location: Gold Coast,Australia

Postby lmcq11 » Fri Jan 19, 2018 9:17 pm

Hi,

Here is the installation of the lower hull.

There is likely many ways to do this conversion. The method I used below seemed the simplest to me, but certainly not the most elegant. However, this is just the basic installation of the lower piece to have a base so i will make it pretty later...

First step is to attach the main struts to the chassis. I reused the hole of the suspension, with larger and longer screws. The height of the armored body is critical and must be calculated properly. The bottom of the hull must be aligned with the middle of the axles, shown a bit further below.

rsz_img_6159.jpg
Ludwigs V-100 conversion


This is the way I installed the engine. On a real V-100, it should be fully enclosed within the armored shield with the drive shaft coming out of the axles likely at 90% strait up, but the WPL chassis does not allow for that. So, I had to align both axles and try to put the engine as high as possible without creating tensions.

rsz_img_6158.jpg
Ludwigs V-100 conversion


The engine and drive shaft are coming out a bit but it won't show much. Notice that the kit part was reused but because the main struts are now aligned with the WPL chassis instead of the kit's designer location, modifications to the kits parts are required to adapt it to the chassis. At this point, just forget it about using the online instructions, I just used the available parts the best I can. I will try to enclose the chassis the best I can later, to avoid mud and dirt getting inside the hull. For now, I just want to align main parts and forget about the look and feel.

rsz_img_6162.jpg
Ludwigs V-100 conversion


It is critical that the hull is well placed on the WPL chassis, horizontal, with the bottom aligned with the center of the 4 axles. It is very easy to make mistakes and install the hull in a distorted way, Be ready for many adjustments phases.

rsz_img_6168.jpg
Ludwigs V-100 conversion


Both front and back were installed as separate modules. It is because the width of the WPL chassis cannot be used all the way end to end. At one point, it needs to go back to the required V-100 width for external accuracy but mainly to fit the front and back armored plates. For the back plate installation, I had to create new larger struts, the ones on the kit part were too small for some reason and the fit was terrible.

rsz_img_6177.jpg
Ludwigs V-100 conversion


Many adjustments from all angles are required. As you can see, the lower hull part of the V-100 have no solid structure because of the wheel well, there are easily distorted in all directions. Care is required in double checking everything many times before gluing anything.

rsz_img_6190.jpg
Ludwigs V-100 conversion


Main parts are in place now but the arrangement will be cosmetically fixed later.

rsz_img_6198.jpg
Ludwigs V-100 conversion


Lower hull view from above

rsz_img_6185.jpg
Ludwigs V-100 conversion


The WPL chassis is not ideal for custom builds. Yes, it is cheap and simple, but I would have like to pay a bit more and have something more robust.

rsz_img_6189.jpg
Ludwigs V-100 conversion


The models as it stands today. You can see where this is going. Admit that it is more exciting to work on a armored car than a pick up truck...

rsz_img_6183.jpg
Ludwigs V-100 conversion


Next step is the upper hull.

Regards, Louis
User avatar
lmcq11
Warrant Officer 1st Class
 
Posts: 1779
Joined: Mon Dec 19, 2016 8:42 pm
Location: Quebec, Canada

Postby Ad Lav » Fri Jan 19, 2018 9:46 pm

Very smart!

Love your use of Ludwigs stranger kits and off the shelf stuff
User avatar
Ad Lav
Lieutenant
 
Posts: 3536
Joined: Tue Sep 01, 2009 4:44 pm
Location: Kent

Postby lmcq11 » Sun Jan 21, 2018 12:52 am

Hi,

This is the upper hull installation step.

Here are the upper hull parts, prepared and ready for assembling.

rsz_img_6200.jpg
Ludwigs V-100 armored car


As shown on Squadron Signal reference, the main joint between the lower and upper hull is rounded on the sides, giving it a much attractive look. So, there is no point is trying to make the joint perfect, putty and a lot of sanding will make it simple and realistic.

rsz_img_6204.jpg
Ludwigs V-100 armored car


Its good that Ludwig provides frames so that the upper hull can be built into a simple module with the right angles, otherwise it would have been a real issue aligning them correctly.

rsz_img_6208.jpg
Ludwigs V-100 armored car


The time consuming work of aligning the lower hull correctly yesterday has payed off. The upper hull sits perfectly on the lower hull with limited work, a pleasant surprise as I was expecting the worst.

rsz_img_6211.jpg
Ludwigs V-100 armored car


I thought it made sense to put braces made of leftover plasticard in order to reinforce the hull joint. You do not want the hull to crack open at the first bump on a wall.

rsz_img_6223.jpg
Ludwigs V-100 armored car


The front parts are surprisingly easy to install and the fit is good. There are very little gaps to fill or to worry about. One of the part is not installed yet because we need access to the wheel wells from above for the following step.

rsz_img_6225.jpg
Ludwigs V-100 armored car


Now that the main upper hull parts solidly assembled, it is time to close the wheel wells with the plasticard parts provided. Even if they are heated up a bit in warm water and pre-shaped as best as possible, the plastic is thick and applies pressure on the hull and I was concerned about the distortion they could create if they were installed before the upper hull is in place. The first one is somewhat challenging to install but the experience helps with the other. No real issue.

rsz_img_6227.jpg
Ludwigs V-100 armored car


They then need to be sanded smooth, flush with the hull.

rsz_img_6232.jpg
Ludwigs V-100 armored car


Considering that I started a week ago, progress is quite fast on these small and simple Ludwig kits. The top of the upper hull will be made removable. As all the hatches will open, there is a lot of access for maintenance, and to install figures. Even the front servo for directions can be easily replaced if needed.

rsz_img_6256.jpg
Ludwigs V-100 armored car


A sight you do not see often, a 1/16 scale V-100 Commando armored car taking shape.

rsz_img_6261.jpg
Ludwigs V-100 armored car


Next step are the putty and sanding phases to make the whole thing smooth and pretty before the smaller parts and detailing can start. This is a fun kit. So far, I recommend it to anyone who want to do something special with a WPL chassis. With so many versions of V-100 and V-150 available sold around the world, with different turrets, there are many possibilities for custom and unique creations.

Regards, Louis
User avatar
lmcq11
Warrant Officer 1st Class
 
Posts: 1779
Joined: Mon Dec 19, 2016 8:42 pm
Location: Quebec, Canada

Postby Ad Lav » Sun Jan 21, 2018 8:39 am

Taking shape nicely!
User avatar
Ad Lav
Lieutenant
 
Posts: 3536
Joined: Tue Sep 01, 2009 4:44 pm
Location: Kent

Postby Raminator » Sun Jan 21, 2018 11:11 am

Absolutely, it's captured that iconic look already. I'm impressed with how well you managed to match the upper and lower halves, should make for a seamless fit.
User avatar
Raminator
Warrant Officer 2nd Class
 
Posts: 1061
Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2015 9:57 am
Location: Newcastle, Australia

Postby HERMAN BIX » Sun Jan 21, 2018 11:46 am

Unmistakably V-100 Sir.
And a massive bonus having a truck base to get things rolling.
Happy sanding mate !!.............you will have loads of practice doing the upper/lower joint :/
User avatar
HERMAN BIX
Lieutenant-Colonel
 
Posts: 7662
Joined: Sun Jan 12, 2014 1:15 am
Location: Gold Coast,Australia

Postby lmcq11 » Wed Jan 24, 2018 1:23 am

Hi,

The V-100 is a sizable vehicle. When compared to the M-113, it is actually longer and as large.

rsz_img_6275.jpg
Ludwigs V-100 Commando


The body has gone through many phases of putty and sanding, not perfect yet but enough to continue with the build. It is really only after the first coat of primer that the true situation will come out of all the whiteness. No point doing the polishing at this time.

rsz_img_6303.jpg
Ludwigs V-100 Commando


Similar to the M-113 build, the interlocking plasticard parts will need a lot of care to get to a smooth finish but the shape seems right.

rsz_img_6330.jpg
Ludwigs V-100 Commando


The frame around the doors and hatches were made of thin plasticard strips. This is important for the look.

rsz_img_6352.jpg
Ludwigs V-100 Commando


rsz_img_6349.jpg
Ludwigs V-100 Commando


The visor on the right was too large and i started the process of making them all similar. Lot of work will go into these.

rsz_img_6313.jpg
Ludwigs V-100 Commando


Now the plan is to go around the vehicle and build everything that needs to be added, one hole at a time. Parts for hatches and hinges are provided but they all need to be dramatically reduced and reshaped for accuracy. Be aware that this specific hatch at the rear had the holes for the hinges on the left. I have not seen photographic evidence of this arrangement so the hinges are relocated at the bottom, as seen in pictures.

rsz_img_6354.jpg
Ludwigs V-100 Commando


Capture.JPG
Ludwigs V-100 Commando
Capture.JPG (34.39 KiB) Viewed 4717 times


Knupfer M1x4 brass bolts are used. Remember that sanding plasticard is a dusty business and a mask should always be worn. The model itself requires thorough cleaning many times per sessions. As you can see, my method uses simple material and although not perfect, it's fast and anyone can replicate.

rsz_img_6360.jpg
Ludwigs V-100 Commando


Regards, Louis
User avatar
lmcq11
Warrant Officer 1st Class
 
Posts: 1779
Joined: Mon Dec 19, 2016 8:42 pm
Location: Quebec, Canada

Postby lmcq11 » Thu Jan 25, 2018 5:02 am

Hi,

Continuing the build as I advance around the vehicle, here is the right door/hatches.

These are the parts provided for the side door. Basic shaped parts that need to be reworked, everything else must be built and positioned according to references.

rsz_img_6381.jpg
Ludwigs V-100 Commando


Those hinges need to be reduced by about half in size and are now at scale but very fragile. It is not a toy so opening the hatches must be done very carefully. Guys that are efficient at building metal parts would likely create metal hinges and laugh at my little hinges that will not last long. I hear you. All pre-drilled holes (periscope, hinges) needed to be filled because they were not at the right location. This door has a lot of angles and a bit complicated to align.

rsz_img_6371.jpg
Ludwigs V-100 Commando


Although I have no plans to build interior details for this model, I gave the inside of the hatches some basic details. I have not built the interior periscope, yet. There is no luxury of available components on the market. There is no book either on how to build this model in an accurate way so I have to research, think and create whatever I want to do. So far, there has been no major mistake that I know of.

rsz_img_6368.jpg
Ludwigs V-100 Commando


I saw on a restored vehicle a latch to lock the vehicle from the outside. I have not built it yet because I have to verify it was also present in the field.

rsz_img_6369.jpg
Ludwigs V-100 Commando


rsz_img_6364.jpg
Ludwigs V-100 Commando


I am learning about the V-100 as a build the various component.

Regards, Louis
User avatar
lmcq11
Warrant Officer 1st Class
 
Posts: 1779
Joined: Mon Dec 19, 2016 8:42 pm
Location: Quebec, Canada

Postby lmcq11 » Wed Feb 07, 2018 4:11 am

Hi,

Slowly going around the vehicle, making and adding items one after the other. The headlights will be kept for the end. Shown on top is the Warriors turret, which will be replicated in plasticard later. I think she will be a great companion for the M-113.

rsz_img_7292.jpg
Ludwigs 1/16 V-100 Commando


Hatches have been made operable, just for the fun of it. I do not intend to build any interior details.

rsz_img_7297.jpg
Ludwigs 1/16 V-100 Commando


These 2 top hatches needed some patience to assemble. I assume lot of putty, sanding and polishing is still required to make them smooth once they have been primes and I can see betterr.

rsz_img_7298.jpg
Ludwigs 1/16 V-100 Commando


Epoxy will be poured later into the visors to simulate the thick glass.

rsz_img_7305.jpg
Ludwigs 1/16 V-100 Commando


rsz_img_7306.jpg
Ludwigs 1/16 V-100 Commando


Regards, Louis
User avatar
lmcq11
Warrant Officer 1st Class
 
Posts: 1779
Joined: Mon Dec 19, 2016 8:42 pm
Location: Quebec, Canada

Postby Ad Lav » Wed Feb 07, 2018 8:14 am

Great progress Louis!
User avatar
Ad Lav
Lieutenant
 
Posts: 3536
Joined: Tue Sep 01, 2009 4:44 pm
Location: Kent

Postby HERMAN BIX » Wed Feb 07, 2018 11:50 am

Something quite special ;)
User avatar
HERMAN BIX
Lieutenant-Colonel
 
Posts: 7662
Joined: Sun Jan 12, 2014 1:15 am
Location: Gold Coast,Australia

Postby 43rdRecceReg » Wed Feb 07, 2018 2:04 pm

Little touches of genius here and there, Louis :thumbup: . The work on the hinges is just one example, and is as educational as the rest of the work on the chassis. :clap:
User avatar
43rdRecceReg
Major
 
Posts: 5863
Joined: Fri Jul 31, 2015 11:38 am
Location: North West Highlands, Scotland

Next

Return to Modern builds

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests