RC 1/16 M113 Lynx C & R - Canadian army 1970s UN mission

Postby lmcq11 » Tue Oct 12, 2021 12:06 am

Hi everyone,

After two complicated builds (GTK Boxer and the Churchill Mk III), it's time for something simpler. It is also time for my yearly M113 build. After a lot of reflection, i have decided to build the small M113 Lynx Command and Recon version, also known as the M113 1/2. Its different.

It is a shorter, smaller and lighter version of the M113, with 4 roadwheels instead of five and no rear ramp. It was sold to the Netherlands and Canada in the 1960s as a reconnaissance vehicle and was armed in Canada with a Browning M2 in cupola and Browning M1919 on the side facing rear. After being replaced, many Lynx were eventually re-sold to Chile and Bahrain. Iran got some empty hulks on the international scrap metal market and managed to put them in service, status unknown.

The model will be represented as a Canadian vehicle in the early configuration of the 1970s during a UN mission somewhere, un-modernized and still armed with the M1919 before its replacement with the FNMag later.

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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build


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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build


For the construction of the 1/16 model, i will be helped by the excellent 1/35 resin kit from Perfect Scale Modellbau for shapes, dimensions and details. It even has excellent 1/35 UN decals that i will bring up to 1/16.

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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build


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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build


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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build


What is nice about this resin kit is the fact that the core is made of two halves for a really fast construction. Just with this, i pretty much has all i need for quite a while.

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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build


Here are some parts gathered for the build, mainly from Tank Modellbau of Germany, and roadwheels from Ludwig. It is not the first time i used these. I thought i could initially fit a Mato gearbox in the hull but it won't fit because of the raised torsion blade suspension so i have to go with plan B.

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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build


The metal tracks with rubber pads are tricky to build but proved to work well after fine tuning.

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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build


Metal sprocket and Idlers are good but need fine tuning to work well.

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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build


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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build


Continuing on following post
Last edited by lmcq11 on Tue Oct 12, 2021 1:05 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Postby lmcq11 » Tue Oct 12, 2021 12:23 am

These are the Ludwig 3D printed M113 roadwheels. Its a reminder to me why i hate 3D printing, they are always a weak point of my builds. In this case, the printing was not successful, the details are breaking off just by touching them. I contacted Chris who agreed there was an issue and will reprint them in stronger material. As it will take time to get the replacements, i will used these for the time being.

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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build


They are meant to use ball bearings. I decided on one inner and one flanged facing the suspension arm.

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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build


The resin Tank Modellbau sprocket gear housing is excellent.

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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build


Tank Modellbau metal suspension arm and sockets. The arms are locked in their sockets and meant to use the torsion blades sold separately.

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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build


i found in an earlier M113 build that they are meant to accept some M3.5 or M4 special screw for the roadwheel shaft that is not available anywhere. I have therefore drilled the hole to accept a thick 4mm brass tube that is hammered in place on both ends, and it now accepts a regular M3 hex screw as a shaft.

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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build


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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build


Construction starts without ceremony, the design is done on the fly as i progress, using the 1/35 kit as a model for dimensions and shapes.

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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build


The exact spacing for the road wheels is taken from the 1/35 kit. The kit looks good so it should be safe... i think.

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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build


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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build


While looking for alternatives to the Mato gearbox, i almost purchased this gearbox from Asiatam in Germany. But at 86 EU for such simple design with off the chart shipping costs and delays, i looked for alternatives. They would still require modification to fit the sprocket, and probably the hull.

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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build
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continuing on following post
Last edited by lmcq11 on Tue Oct 12, 2021 1:24 am, edited 4 times in total.
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Postby lmcq11 » Tue Oct 12, 2021 12:41 am

I have these JGA25-370 DC6V at 250RPM with encoder on inventory. These go back to my M113 build with the TOW launcher, i will try the same propulsion method here but with these higher RPM motors. Only the red and white wires are required to work with the Clark control board, no complex robotics here. They run real smooth and silent.

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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build


I got these strong shafts with 4mm axle earlier for $15, including shipping. I always keep one set on inventory.

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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build
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Flanged bearings with 4mm inner hole are used on both sides of each sprocket.

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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build


It is critical that they are installed strait and tested with the shaft before finalizing the installation.

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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build


Because the sprocket hub no longer goes inside the sprocket gear housing, i had to reduce the length of it. Not easy as this is really hard metal. I also prepared each sprocket teeth by filing them smooth as they would otherwise cut into the tracks and not work.

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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build


The shaft were prepared.

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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build


And installed.

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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build


The suspension arms were temporarily installed to create the brackets that will make them operational with the torsion blade locked in place.

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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build


The suspension arms need to be tested and finetuned to eliminate any resistance.

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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build


Suspension arms are equipped with torsion blades from Tank Modellbau. For now, i put firmer Leopard 1 torsion blades on the first wheel, and M113 blades on the others.

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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build


continuing on following post
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Postby lmcq11 » Tue Oct 12, 2021 12:55 am

Roadwheels installed, and the plastic bracket for the torsion blades was also reinforced from above.

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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build


The height of the hull looks ok, maybe a bit high, but will adjust later as required.

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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build


A Sherman Mato track adjuster is cannibalized to reuse its core to serve as a M113 track adjuster. No need for anything more expensive or complicated.

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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build


The center hole of the idler wheels needed to be enlarged to accept the bigger ball bearings that fit the Mato adjuster. Two ball bearings are used side by side inside each idler wheel, locked with the mato screw and bigger washers.

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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build


In no time, i have two M113 track adjusters with metal idlers on ball bearings.

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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build


Idlers installed. The whole chassis runs on ball bearings.

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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build


I had to put a 2mm spacer for the teeth of the adjuster to bite into something other than the hull, and also to align the idler wheel with the roadwheels.

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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build


It is critical to align every wheels.

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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build


The construction of the upper hull is starting.

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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build


Planning view of how the motors will be installed. Every millimeter counts on such build so it seems to fit. The idea is to position the motors in a way that fit the allocated room inside the hull, while minimizing the friction cause by bending the shaft too much. This will take delicate fine tuning and testing once the core of the upper hull body is build.

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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build


That is it for now, next step; construction of the upper hull armored plates.

Regards, Louis
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Postby jhamm » Tue Oct 12, 2021 6:26 am

Good Morning Louis,
yes, the parts from Chris lately are always only usable on the second try.
Many parts that were previously made of metal are now 3D printed.
This is a loss of strength, especially with rollers.
The surface quality and details are often also affected.
With a little effort, you can also achieve very good results with 3D printing.
The idler wheel of the Cromwell:

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or for my sWS build the rim of the front wheel:

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But this need time and a 3D-Printer with small Nozzle of 0,2mm gives much moore detailed and better surfaces.
A resine printer gives much better results, but the stability of the parts is very low...

Nevertheless, you are on your way to creating another wonderful model!
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Postby tankme » Tue Oct 12, 2021 8:05 am

With the 3D printed wheels you could clean up the best ones, make those smooth, and make molds of them. Then replicate them in a good resin. On the other hand you did pay for something and expected it not to fall apart before even installing them so I can understand waiting for replacements.

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Postby Raminator » Tue Oct 12, 2021 11:02 am

Another unique and interesting build Louis, we'll all be following along with interest. I'd never heard of these mini-113s before, it's a neat little vehicle. I'm looking forward to see how you squeeze all of the functional bits in!

jhamm wrote:A resine printer gives much better results, but the stability of the parts is very low...

There are some very strong engineering resins available now, I've had good results resin-printing roadwheels recently. They're as strong as ABS, and almost as smooth as injection-moulded parts.

I didn't get into 3D printing for a long time because of the limitations of FDM printing, the layer lines are prohibitive for the kind of fine details I want to print. The sintered nylon Christian uses is even worse in that regard, but at least it's strong.
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Postby PershingLover » Thu Oct 14, 2021 3:58 pm

Back at it again? At least it's a better addiction than drugs.. Maybe more expensive though :eh: Good luck with the build!
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Postby lmcq11 » Thu Oct 14, 2021 11:06 pm

jhamm wrote:The surface quality and details are often also affected.
With a little effort, you can also achieve very good results with 3D printing.


tankme wrote:With the 3D printed wheels you could clean up the best ones, make those smooth, and make molds of them. Then replicate them in a good resin. On the other hand you did pay for something and expected it not to fall apart before even installing them so I can understand waiting for replacements.


Thank you jhamm, tankme and raminator for your advice. I'll see first what Chris is able to do with his new printing material. As a Plan B, I already removed all the bolts features on the existing road wheels (i just had to rub my fingers against the wheel to remove them...). I was thinking of sanding them better and pour some enamel product on them to make them smoother, and then add brass bolts. I'll see.

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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build


Raminator wrote:Another unique and interesting build Louis, we'll all be following along with interest. I'd never heard of these mini-113s before, it's a neat little vehicle. I'm looking forward to see how you squeeze all of the functional bits in!


Yes, small and cute little vehicle, pretty square, no turret and easy to model. It does not take much room on the shelves either. My Panther and Tiger days are way behind me, i need new types of vehicles to have fun with and learn new stuff. I usually used a Ludwig base kit to start with but this is the first time that i actually build something totally from the ground up from scratch, and no interlocking joints to worry about and fill. I guess i have reached this point.

PershingLover wrote:Back at it again? At least it's a better addiction than drugs.. Maybe more expensive though Good luck with the build!


Thanks, in the 3 past decades, I always had a project on the work bench. With age, the hobby budget keep increasing. Some smoke it, some drink it, some play it. I prefer to build stuff. I know that one day when i get old, i will have to sell this stuff, so i should be able to get the investment back and spend it on winter cruises...

Continuing with the build.

The side armor plates are created.

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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build


And installed.

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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build


The protuberant front fenders are created.

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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build


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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build


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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build


The roof is created and made removable, providing complete access to the electronics by just lifting it.

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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build


With the left angled front armor installed, i can figure out the installation of the motors.

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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build


After a lot of calculations and analysis to determine the best position that minimize friction and optimize the efficiency, the bottom right motor is installed first. Those motors only have 2 attachment points at the front for M3 bolts. In order to help stabilizing the long motors, rudimentary brackets were created at the back to provide more support and kept the motors from vibrating. As every millimeter of space is important on such build, i did carve the interior of the armor plate where required to provide additional space for the motors to be positioned more efficiently. Looks weird to do this but these make a real difference.

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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build


Left motor and shaft are installed above the right one. They do not touch. Again, the bracket at the back is just for stabilizing support as the anchor point is at the front of the motor. Lots of testing went into this. It runs like a charm.

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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build


Continuing on following post.
Last edited by lmcq11 on Thu Oct 14, 2021 11:53 pm, edited 3 times in total.
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Postby lmcq11 » Thu Oct 14, 2021 11:24 pm

Close up on the motors.

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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build


This type of motorization arrangement is a cheap and simple way to get to the absolute front bottom of the vehicle where the sprocket wheel shafts are located. With regular gearbox on the market, it is always a struggle to get as low as possible, achieved by giving an angle to the gearbox and it never fully reaches it. In this solution here, the secret is to find the optimal position for the drive shafts so that none of the two flexible point is bended at maximum, which would impact performance and give the model a bad bumpy ride. It is not easy and it takes a lot of analysis, trial and error process, and testing.

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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build


The M113 Lynx is equipped with a front hatch provided total access to the front of the motors, mount points and the whole drive shafts. Everything can be removed from this access panel, which is great for maintenance as well.

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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build


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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build


With the motors installed and fully tested, the frontal armor panel on the right is created and installed.

The motors are surprisingly powerful. Speed control is great and they can go real fast as well.

I could provide at this time a video of the motors and gears in action but I was waiting for the tracks to be built and installed. This will be the real test to see this whole setup work with tracks on.

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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build


Here is a first peek at the M113 Lynx basic shapes in 1/16 scale.

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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build


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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build


The frontal hatch will be operable.

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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build


Here is the model as it stands today next to its 1/35 little brother.

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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build


Regards, Louis
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Postby inger » Fri Oct 15, 2021 3:36 am

Another fabulous build Louis!

I know I am few posts behind here but I just wanted mention my positive experience with 3D printed parts. I am currently using parts printed for my project in two different materials using two type of printing system.

For really big parts such as bar armour, I am using PLA+. This is a thermoplastic made from plant starch such as corn. This material is really tough and when printed with a 0.01mm nozzle is able to reproduce small details to a sufficiently accurate standard. There is also minimal layering. For 1/16 roadwheels, this would be a a good material because of its toughness and ability reproduce details such as bolt heads.

For small high detail parts, I am using a resin called Samos 128 and SLA printing. This material is really tough but has the added benefit of being able to be printed with 0.05 nozzle which delivers a highly detailed super smooth finish. This would be a good material to use for making masters for molds and resin casting.

My two cents.

And BTW your drive solution is really clever - very impressive!

Looking forward to following this build.

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Postby Herr Dr. Professor » Fri Oct 15, 2021 11:00 pm

How interesting! I have never seen--much less thought up--a cross driveshaft drive. You have explained the challenge of getting the angles right, and you indicate good speed control. Apparently 250 RPM is slow enough. That sets me to thinking about the mathematical relationship between drive sprocket RPM and track speed.
250 X some variable % of the circumference of the bottom of the drive cog = track speed = ground speed.
You can tell that I was no mathematics prof. :wtf:
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Postby lmcq11 » Fri Oct 15, 2021 11:59 pm

inger wrote:I know I am few posts behind here but I just wanted mention my positive experience with 3D printed parts. I am currently using parts printed for my project in two different materials using two type of printing system.

Thank you ! my personal expectations from vendors selling high cost 3D parts are high. I had a string of disappointments lately. I actually can't remember saying "wow" on any purchase of 3d parts. Vendor print standards and customer expectations are very wide it seems. I agree with the fact that I will need to design and print my own parts at one point.

Herr Dr. Professor wrote:How interesting! I have never seen--much less thought up--a cross driveshaft drive. You have explained the challenge of getting the angles right, and you indicate good speed control. Apparently 250 RPM is slow enough. That sets me to thinking about the mathematical relationship between drive sprocket RPM and track speed.
250 X some variable % of the circumference of the bottom of the drive cog = track speed = ground speed.
You can tell that I was no mathematics prof

The control board and sprocket size are also a factor. Not sure how the encoder at the back of the motor impacts performance. There are so many variations of those motors in 6 and 12 volts DC, different RPM gearbox from 10 to 1000+ and different quality. I used 160 RPM on the M113A2 build two years ago and found it to be too slow. Going up to 250RPM this time is a trial. I assume higher RPM means less torque, not sure. I picked good quality ones. I'll see what it gives for real only once the tracks are built and can do some tests. So far, it looks promising.
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Postby HERMAN BIX » Sat Oct 16, 2021 8:15 am

That drive shaft solution is a stroke of pure genius Mr Mcq11
I get that the notchy operation manifesting itself depending on angle is why CV joints are used in cars.
The velocity of the outside of the rotating joint V's the velocity of the inside of the joint effectively means there is a speed up/slow down each revolution of the shaft as a result of the angle if not addressed.
Out of all your cunning ways out of a sticky modelling situation, that drive system is an award winner :clap: :clap:

Its almost like the Canadians got their "Pimp My Ride" on with the 113 & made it something special :haha:
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Postby lmcq11 » Sun Oct 17, 2021 12:08 am

Thanks Herman, The M113 Lynx is a cool Recce vehicle, with retro features of the 1960s. The American selected the M114 instead and it was a major failure. Let's see how the motorization works with the tracks on. I am currently building them, should be done in a couple of days and will provide video.

First, i need to complete the exterior armor in order to prevent residue from the construction and dust from sanding from getting inside the chassis, drive shafts, etc. The rear panel is put on, with the overlay for the static hatch. The round corners of the hatch are done with the roundel tool.

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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build


As shown in reference and contrary to the 1/35 kit, the armored roof is not flush with the side armor plates, it has a partial overlay to reproduce.

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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build
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The overlay layer is added to the model roof, the top being removable, it also hide the top joints for a nice finish. Nice smooth base to build on the details.

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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build
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Side view of the frontal hatch with the water gutter around it and the large hinges typical of the M113.

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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build
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The large frontal hatch is installed with working hinge to access the motors and drive shafts inside the hull.

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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build


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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build


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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build


The model as it stands tonight.

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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build


The rear armor has the same overlay.

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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build
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Now i have a sealed hull. Other than building the tracks and test the integrations, the model needs a lot of details that will take time to build one after another, but it is mostly cosmetics, no more major technical design challenges.

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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build


continuing on following post
Last edited by lmcq11 on Sun Oct 17, 2021 12:34 am, edited 3 times in total.
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Postby lmcq11 » Sun Oct 17, 2021 12:15 am

Starting to build the tracks.

First the pins need to be prepared by removing one of the end point. Looks like the end points were molded on the pins. It takes pliers in 2 steps to remove them.

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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build


Every links and pin attachment points need to be sanded and polished for a smooth operation. You can see the bleeding on the mouldings below. This is pretty hard metal to work with. It just takes time.

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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build


Then assembled but without the rubber pads at this time. The tracks need to be built very tight, the end point is hammered on the pins but use of many pliers is required, sometimes i need to go back and reapply pressure to squeeze each connector, then file again. If the track pins are too loose on the links, the tracks will work badly. Some few links are also smaller than others by 0.5mm for some mysterious reasons. Because i think i will have many extras, the short ones are discarded.

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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build


It also takes time to cut the extra length of each pins, and then file the tip. These metal pins are hard as nails and need large cutter and muscle to cut. Its not the first time i build these.

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RC 1/16 M113 Lynx Command and Recon tank - build


I figure it will take a day or two.

Regards, Louis
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Postby Raminator » Mon Oct 18, 2021 9:35 am

Coming together with your trademark speed and skill, Louis. I'm looking forward to seeing how those tracks go with the driveshafts. I have faith in your engineering ingenuity!
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Postby lmcq11 » Tue Oct 19, 2021 7:02 pm

Thank you Raminator and everyone watching for your encouragements.

The new Tank Modellbau metal tracks are finally assembled, taking about 6 hours in total. I used a Dremel cutting disk to cut the extra length of the pins. They are without their rubber pads that will be installed only after painting. One pin has not been finalized for easy removal of the tracks. Being new and hand built, the tracks are still a bit stiff, showing it more at low speeds but they have much improving after a break in period of 30 minutes on the bench running at full speed. There is always a couple of links or sprocket teeth that cause more friction than others and need more filing. Keep in mind the tracks represents the NATO German made M-113 variant used later by Canada and other countries, not the American T130E1 tracks.

Here is a video of the motorization testing at various speeds. Its running pretty smooth for such a scratch built setup.

phpBB [video]


Regards, Louis
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Postby Herr Dr. Professor » Wed Oct 20, 2021 3:41 am

It is impressive to see the tracks and that cross-shaft arrangement running so smoooothly! Congratulations on an engineering feat supreme!
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