Best solder for rc tanks?

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Postby Jnewboy » Mon Mar 26, 2018 4:58 am

I know how to solder but it's not something I normally have to do. On my current project several wires have tore away from their soldered connections. What is the best solder to use?
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Postby gp100 » Mon Mar 26, 2018 7:34 am

Standard 60/40.

Don't use that lead free junk.. It's not as good in my opinion.. Just use the standard ol' solder we've always used..

The thinner, the better. You'll be fine if you have a decent iron.
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Postby Rad_Schuhart » Mon Mar 26, 2018 7:34 am

I use a cheap 4 euros solder with regulable temperature for everything. I think this is one of the cases where is more important the indian than the arrow.
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Postby gp100 » Tue Mar 27, 2018 1:56 pm

Everything Son of a gunner said is correct..

Be careful of keeping an iron on a spot to long.. You can easily burn up a circuit trace or component.. Things get hot quick..

Use the thinnest solder you can find.. Very thin like fine wire if you can.. Never use a Bazooka to kill a fly is my motto..

It also melts faster due to the size of the solder.. And that can be key when working on things like this..

Get in and out as quick as possible with a small wire and solder point..
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Postby RenoirLV » Thu Mar 29, 2018 3:05 pm

My limited experience shows that skills could be more important than the price of equipment. In Latvian we have a saying that roughly translates as "a bad dancer would claim his balls are in the way".

Overheating is a huge problem on small items like we have in rc tanks.


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Postby capt midnight » Fri Mar 30, 2018 3:52 am

Yes, the thin solder is the way to go. I picked up a fairly inexpensive digital soldering station that I use for everything from soldering circuit boards to copper and brass for fenders, schurzen, and such.

I have found out that I have better luck with soldering wires, LED's, and circuit boards at a higher temperature. It seems to solder faster without pumping a large amount of heat into the work.

Bill
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Postby tanker ed » Sat Mar 31, 2018 6:11 pm

Here you go maybe this will be helpful


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1AeK7goc_xM


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Postby Maccrage » Sat Mar 31, 2018 7:54 pm

Just be careful. Soldering irons be hot, yo.

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Postby Maccrage » Sat Mar 31, 2018 9:25 pm

:thumbup:

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Postby Raminator » Mon Apr 02, 2018 10:29 am

gp100 wrote:Standard 60/40.

Don't use that lead free junk.. It's not as good in my opinion.. Just use the standard ol' solder we've always used..

That's for damn sure. I've been hoarding my big old roll just in case they start cracking down on ROHS and 60/40 gets hard to find :shifty:
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Postby Max-U52 » Mon Apr 02, 2018 9:30 pm

This is what I use

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0001 ... UTF8&psc=1

Works great, haven't had any trouble with it.
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Postby silversurfer1947 » Mon Apr 02, 2018 9:38 pm

Somewhat ironic. Sold by Great British Tools. Won't ship to the United Kingdom!
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Postby Maccrage » Tue Apr 03, 2018 7:09 am

So is this good? I am a solder newb.

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Postby gp100 » Tue Apr 03, 2018 6:44 pm

Maccrage wrote:So is this good? I am a solder newb.

Image


Standard 60/40 Rosin core.. yup. That will do very nicely.. Excellent diameter as well.. The thinner the better. Like very fine wire..

You are good to go. Happy soldering! :thumbup:
Last edited by gp100 on Wed Apr 04, 2018 8:02 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Maccrage » Tue Apr 03, 2018 7:13 pm

Awesome. I may have been a Navy Radioman, but we were users. Left the repair side to the ETs. And I never needed solder more than 3 times building models. Now I find I need it almost daily, and I have no idea what I'm doing.

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Postby gp100 » Wed Apr 04, 2018 8:00 am

Son of a gun-ner wrote:Will these do Mista. . . . Only 0.7mm thick :D

Image


Yes. It is perfect Sir..

Standard 60/40 Rosin Core. Perfect. and the diameter or thickness is excellent for this type of work.. Like I said earlier, this is the perfect thickness to use on electronics such as tanks where you have delicate and small connections.

The thinner the solder, the faster the melting point will be.. Takes less time to heat up than a real thick solder..

And speed is of the essence here.. You don't want to heat the solder pads or traces any more than you need to..

So the solder you guys have shown me, is an excellent choice for your needs.

I highly recommend that you keep a roll of this stuff in storage at all times for "just in case" events like this when you need it..

If at all possible, after you solder the connection you need to do, use a small magnifying glass to double check the work..

Make sure you do not "bridge" 2 connections accidentally.. What I mean by that, is make sure there is no tiny solder blob that touches 2 solder pads together.. Make sure each solder connection is separate..

Here's a quick way to tell if your using good old 60/40 "lead" based solder..

The lead free junk out there will dry to a dull finish.. Lead based solder will dry with a nice silver shine to it.. Kind of like a gloss look.. Lead free will look like a blob of dull grey.. No silver shine..

Hope this helps. :wave:
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Postby gp100 » Wed Apr 04, 2018 8:21 am

Here are 2 of the soldering stations I actually use in my shop here..

However, you don't need all that fancy shmancy crap like what I have.. Any decent $20-$30 soldering iron will do the job..

So don't worry if you don't have the best most expensive stuff out there.. You don't need it..

The only reason I have this stuff is because I design and build electronics as a side job..

I design mother boards for companies like ASUS.. I actually had a hand in designing the M5A97 R2.0 Motherboard for ASUS back a few years ago..

So for me, I have to have soldering stations like this.. But you do not need it..

Here are both of mine..

This one is for my everyday crap, as I call it..

https://www.xtronicusa.com/4-IN-1-X-TRONIC-8080-XTS-HOT-AIR-REWORK-SOLDERING-IRON-STATION-&-DC-POWER-SUPPLY-p15959845

And this one is used when I need something more to do a job..

https://www.xtronicusa.com/X-TRONIC-5000-SERIES-MODEL-5040-XTS-Hot-Air-Rework-Station-&-Preheating-Station-p25881615


Both of these units are overkill for the average home user.. This is made more for the industrial/commercial side of things..

I just thought you guys would want to see some of my toys since you guys get into electronics and stuff like that..
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Postby gp100 » Wed Apr 04, 2018 8:51 am

capt midnight wrote:Yes, the thin solder is the way to go. I picked up a fairly inexpensive digital soldering station that I use for everything from soldering circuit boards to copper and brass for fenders, schurzen, and such.

I have found out that I have better luck with soldering wires, LED's, and circuit boards at a higher temperature. It seems to solder faster without pumping a large amount of heat into the work.

Bill


You are 100% correct Bill..

Heat is the enemy here.. To much heat can and will damage components on the board.. So like I said in an earlier post, the way to go is "get in and out" as fast as possible here.. I typically use a setting of 380C-400C for my work.. Other people might find that 350C-380C works best. Depends on the work and the amount of solder on the original connection.. And of course, different irons will have different heat characteristics..

Then of course, you get into the newer SMT parts.. (Surface Mount Technology) Which again, requires a different treatment..

It can be a learning curve for new people.. But anybody can do this stuff.. It isn't rocket science.. With enough practice, anyone can do it.. There are plenty of YouTube video's out there to learn with..

And, most of the people involved with this hobby already have the brains and skill set to become an expert in soldering technique..

:thumbup:
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Postby ronnie42 » Wed Apr 04, 2018 10:35 am

Soldering, what flux to buy? My RS branded flux pen has run out, had a wide tip .Was not very good for small parts, going for liquid in tin/bottle any recommendations ?

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Postby Max-U52 » Wed Apr 04, 2018 2:19 pm

ronnie42 wrote:Soldering, what flux to buy? My RS branded flux pen has run out, had a wide tip .Was not very good for small parts, going for liquid in tin/bottle any recommendations ?


One of the reasons I like the multicore solder that I posted the link for so much is because you don't need flux. It melts extremely fast and it's great for electronics. I've been using it for about 5 years and I've never had a single problem.
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