Using Photo-etch parts

Feel free to discuss anything and everything to do with tanking here!

Postby 43rdRecceReg » Tue Dec 03, 2019 11:48 am

Aside from fitting some PE grills to the engine deck of my first Tiger 1, I've not had any experience of using PE parts. Lately, though, I received two VoyagerModel packages (Side skirts/ Fenders) as part of another package. These prompted a bit of surfing, where I found a couple of really useful guides to PE parts usage and fitting. Do check 'em out, if you're interested.
Photo_etch_tiny_parts1.jpg
Typical Photo-Etch sheet

http://www.scalemodelguide.com/construc ... ts-models/
http://italianhorses.net/Tutorials/Photoetch/pe.htm
If I find, eventually, I have no use for the Voyager parts, I might well put them on offer here. :) These look like they need watchmaker hands and eyes :problem: I have an illuminated Lupe lamp, and that assists the
peepers; but there's not much I can do about the Gherkin fingers. :lolno: ;)
Last edited by 43rdRecceReg on Tue Dec 03, 2019 3:51 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby jhamm » Tue Dec 03, 2019 12:41 pm

You pay a lot of attention!
These parts are so small - don´t inhale... :haha:

I have the same problem too,
parts which smaller than 1mmx5mm is too small for my fingers.
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Postby silversurfer1947 » Tue Dec 03, 2019 2:21 pm

I think I must have a degree of masochistic tendencies as I keep buying photo etch sets for my tanks. I am currently battling with the one for my Panzer 38(T). Each time I start, my admiration for people who produce all those masterpieces grows exponentially. I struggle every time, yet there are people who use photo tech in 1/35 scale!!!
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Postby PainlessWolf » Tue Dec 03, 2019 3:57 pm

Good Morning,
When the tip of your finger is the work table surface under the magnifying lens and you are holding your breath so as not to blow the folded brass off by accident... You are a Modeling Detailer and the Detail Devil is right there at your shoulder, chuckling. Adds so much when it is done tho'. So all puns aside, bring on the Eye Candy!
regards,
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Postby General Jumbo01 » Tue Dec 03, 2019 4:00 pm

It's what we have children and grandchildren for :D When you snip off the part you want it's inbuilt DNA causes it to spring skywards away from the work bench only to bounce off a nearby hard surface and fire across the room deep into an unlit area of long shagpile. Finding it is their job!
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Postby silversurfer1947 » Tue Dec 03, 2019 4:06 pm

General Jumbo01 wrote:It's what we have children and grandchildren for :D When you snip off the part you want it's inbuilt DNA causes it to spring skywards away from the work bench only to bounce off a nearby hard surface and fire across the room deep into an unlit area of long shagpile. Finding it is their job!

Unfortunately I gave no children or grandchildren so when the pieces run away, they tend to stay lost. I have tried putting down a dust sheet but the brass seems to find its way through! It does mean however, that of necessity I have learned some very basic brass scratchbuilding to produce passable replacements
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Postby General Jumbo01 » Tue Dec 03, 2019 4:14 pm

Replacement parts are far cheaper than children so don't feel hard done by! ;)
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Postby 43rdRecceReg » Tue Dec 03, 2019 4:17 pm

General Jumbo01 wrote:It's what we have children and grandchildren for :D When you snip off the part you want it's inbuilt DNA causes it to spring skywards away from the work bench only to bounce off a nearby hard surface and fire across the room deep into an unlit area of long shagpile. Finding it is their job!


Even without going down to the micro, inhalable, tank parts level (...and what must PE fitting be like at 1:35 scale :O ) I still find bits pinging off into oblivion. I've forgotten how many times, before emptying the vacuum cleaner's dust receptacle, I've emptied the contents onto an old newspaper to search for the most recent loss. :/
I have kids and grandchildren, but they live so far away, they might as well have a lunar postcode. ;)
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Postby silversurfer1947 » Tue Dec 03, 2019 4:23 pm

One useful trick is to wrap an old handkerchief or stocking over the nozzle of the vacuum. If you stop at regular intervals, it does make searching through the rubbish easier. Still does not find all my missing pieces though.
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Postby 43rdRecceReg » Tue Dec 03, 2019 4:29 pm

silversurfer1947 wrote:
General Jumbo01 wrote:It's what we have children and grandchildren for :D When you snip off the part you want it's inbuilt DNA causes it to spring skywards away from the work bench only to bounce off a nearby hard surface and fire across the room deep into an unlit area of long shagpile. Finding it is their job!

Unfortunately I gave no children or grandchildren so when the pieces run away, they tend to stay lost. I have tried putting down a dust sheet but the brass seems to find its way through! It does mean however, that of necessity I have learned some very basic brass scratchbuilding to produce passable replacements



Ditto, Richard, apart from the Offspring. I chew quite a lot of xylitol chewing gum when modelmaking. The type I prefer comes in handy screwtop plastic containers. These end up labelled 'Tamiya 'A' parts', 'B' parts and so on. Ditto for Taigen, HL etc.
The plastic packets that Tamiya screws appear in, have a habit of spitting and disgorging their contents all over the floor. :O >:<
For this reason, I cut them open with extreme care, and transfer the bits to said containers...lest I end up creaking, and cursing, along the floor with a lupe and a magnet (where appropriate :D )
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Postby 43rdRecceReg » Tue Dec 03, 2019 4:35 pm

PainlessWolf wrote:Good Morning,
When the tip of your finger is the work table surface under the magnifying lens and you are holding your breath so as not to blow the folded brass off by accident... You are a Modeling Detailer and the Detail Devil is right there at your shoulder, chuckling. Adds so much when it is done tho'. So all puns aside, bring on the Eye Candy!
regards,
Painless

Afternoon, Painless!
Yes, well, I've seen your meticulous handiwork and wonder how you (Thinking of Shaun, and his upcoming peeper-op).. ever managed to fit those Lilliputian parts, with the incipient cataracts you once had.
My admiration knows no bounds. :thumbup: :D
Mini-details require not only good eyes (even with a lupe) and good hands; but also excellent hand/eye co-ordination.
I can manage the coordination. :|
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Postby General Jumbo01 » Tue Dec 03, 2019 4:36 pm

Another little tip. Always check inside your shoes/slippers! :D
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Postby 43rdRecceReg » Tue Dec 03, 2019 4:45 pm

General Jumbo01 wrote:Another little tip. Always check inside your shoes/slippers! :D


Yes, and all the neighbouring cleavage- if you're a fan of 'Carry On' films.
I can just image Kenneth Connor's 'qwooor!!!' at retrieving the wayward component. :haha:
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Postby 43rdRecceReg » Tue Dec 03, 2019 4:47 pm

Incidentally, these are the side skirts I received (came free with a battered Tamiya):
VoyagerModel skirts.jpg
Voyager Tiger 1 skirts

and this is the company:
http://www.voyagermodel.com/INDEX.ASP
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Postby PainlessWolf » Tue Dec 03, 2019 5:08 pm

Good Morning, Roy,
Yes, it is a lot more fun ( again ) these days with renewed eyesight. I suppose that I did not know then that I had a problem with my eyes and just put it down to tiredness, etc. I have an enormous, lighted magnifier lens on my tensor lamp and that is what I use when miniature PE is called for. No sense getting eyestrain no matter what shape your eyes are in. ;o) Thank you, Sir. I am following along on your escapades and enjoying the builds immensely. I have half the current truck chassis wired and hope to be able to screw everything back together soon and apply markings. Then there is the towable artillery but that should be a 'doddle' as it is just a straight build model kit. ;o)
regards,
Painless

P.S. ABER and VOYAGER are the big names in PE. I've worked a lot with ABER on 1/16 and a little with VOYAGER ( for smaller scales ) Both are fiddly but Voyager parts seem to be more robust.
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Postby Max-U52 » Tue Dec 03, 2019 5:26 pm

silversurfer1947 wrote:One useful trick is to wrap an old handkerchief or stocking over the nozzle of the vacuum. If you stop at regular intervals, it does make searching through the rubbish easier. Still does not find all my missing pieces though.


Yes, that can be a very useful trick, in fact, so useful that I once did a video on how to do it. I used a piece of nylon stocking that I got from a girl I know and wrapped it around the nozzle with a rubber band and I haven't lost a small piece since.
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Postby jarndice » Tue Dec 03, 2019 6:13 pm

My masochistic nature embraces PE, I agree that Voyager is easier to work with`indeed where there is an overlap in the product range I will forgo Abers product and take Voyagers usually cheaper and simpler alternative,
A tip when it comes to joining PE to PE is to use Liquid solder and a butane torch,
Brush on the solder sparingly along the relevant seam, apply the heat and a neat join (after a bit of practice) is the end result.
If retaining loose PE is the problem then I would suggest using a thin sheet of Plasticine to keep it safe until you need it.
I have as it has already been mentioned put my builds on hold until the New Year,
I have been cheered by Painless positive response to his treatment and the excellent results of the operation, :thumbup:
In the UK using the free NHS (National Health Service) there are two particular differences from using a private surgeon, (Although most Cataract operations carried out by the NHS are actually done through a private provider.)
The first is that one eye is operated on very soon after the cataracts have been confirmed the other eye approximately six months later, the second difference is that the NHS ask whether you want a "Distance Lens or a Reading Lens"?
If you want both you have to go private,
The only real downside is that wearing spectacles becomes a must because of the inability of the manmade lens being able to adjust ones vision whereas the multi-lens can often negate the need for glasses,
A small price for a return to decent sight. :D
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Postby PainlessWolf » Tue Dec 03, 2019 7:32 pm

Good Morning, Jarndice,
Here it was one eye then 30 days later, the other eye was operated on. I went for the distance lens since it offered the best improvement for middle to distance usage ( I spend a lot of time outdoors here on the property ) It works best for daily tasks such as house cleaning, laundry, cooking, etc... I can read without the 'light magnification' eyeglasses they provided but find for extended periods and for 'very' close up modeling work, the glasses are super useful to prevent eye strain.
regards and enjoy your new clarity of vision,
Painless
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Postby tankme » Tue Dec 03, 2019 8:05 pm

I have been bending and soldering a lot of PE lately and I found that a PE bending tool is HIGHLY recommended for larger PE parts that need to be bent. I also don't solder them with my soldering iron anymore. I picked up some solder paste and flux. After applying the flux and paste to the parts I get the solder to flow using my heat gun that has multiple tip sizes and a temp control. Works really well and doesn't leave a bunch of excess solder to clean up. I too need one of those lit magnifying lamps to see a lot of the parts and do the work.

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Postby 43rdRecceReg » Wed Dec 04, 2019 12:46 am

Thanks all, for the useful tips! One of the sites I linked to earlier (Scale Model Guide) suggested that any good PE kit should include a PE folder/bending tool, as well as some decent CA superglue. Zap a gap was recommended.
Any favourite bonding agents here, for diehard PE modellers?
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